September 2017

Anne Marvin Blog Posts

Sensitivity and Snowflakes

Sensitivity and Snowflakes

I’m still thinking about G.A. Aiken’s Bring the Heat, the latest in her Dragon Kin series. I love these books. The characters are so deliciously bloodthirsty and direct. It’s refreshing. So many in this world hide behind silence and indirect attacks. I love the lack of filter, having almost none myself. It’s good to spend time with those of a like mind, even if it’s only between pages. Especially then.  But I digress before I’ve even begun. Why am I thinking of filters and frankness? Because G.A. Aiken also writes about the sensitives in the world—hers and ours. In describing one of the characters who “felt more deeply, lived more heartily, loved with her entire being,” the author also noted that “she could also break more easily and all that lovely goodness curdle.”  In our world, we call these people “snowflakes,” those who melt at the first sign of any heat.… READ MORE

True Believers

True Believers

I love paranormal fantasy. There is no other genre like it.  Where else can authors think up the most extreme, fantastical scenarios to make a point about good old fashioned reality?  Nowhere else will you find such Truth in Fantasy. In today’s ripped-from-the-headlines post, we are discussing the almost inconceivable—to me—phenomenon of zealotry and the ridiculous lengths to which idiots will go to conform to beliefs that defy logic. Before you argue too quickly with me, I do understand that a man rising from the dead after three days defies logic, as does a burning bush and a hat that talks, but I’m talking philosophy not mythology. What I don’t understand and cannot possibly relate to is the idea that there’s a deity out there that espouses hate, marginalization and violence. Or that any world view worth fighting and dying for would advocate genocide or racial enslavement. Who are these… READ MORE

The Zombie Apocalypse

The Zombie Apocalypse

I’m still contemplating Michael G. Williams’ Perishables. Withrow Surrett, vampire and artist, occupied my thoughts long after I turned the last page of his story. In the book, Withrow was instrumental in stopping the second zombie apocalypse—having already survived the trenches of the first foray towards Armageddon. In the second attack, he is desperate to avoid being turned into a zombie not because he fears death, but because he is determined to fight against the erasure of his essential self.  Withrow viewed his transformation from human into vampire as the “gift of ultimate and eternal self.” I’ve never heard immortality described that way, but, like all good ideas, it seems glaringly obvious once I read it. Most books focus on the physical aspect of immortality—the preservation of a healthy, strong and youthful body. In Withrow’s case, his 350 pounds perpetuated for posterity might not be perfect, but he gets to… READ MORE

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